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Old Montreal

Old Montreal
Old Montreal is, as you can guess, the oldest part of the city, which still retains some buildings of the period of New France. It is located in the district of Ville-Marie, North of river St. Lawrence. In the area of Old Montreal are such prominent attractions as the old port, town Hall, the Basilica Notre Dame, Montreal clock tower, Jacques Cartier bridge. Most of Old Montreal, the Ministry of culture of Quebec declared historic district in 1964. The relatively ancient history of this district begins with the founding at the confluence of the rivers St. And Lawrence river little settlement of Ville-Marie in 1642 and Fort Societe-Notre-Dame-de-Montreal in 1643 First street of the colony were laid on top of existing trails and got the names of Rue Notre-Dame, the Rue Saint Paul and Rue Saint-Jacques. Their original clutches still lurks somewhere. To the same period belong several of the oldest preserved architectural monuments of the area: the oldest in the city hospital Hotel-Dieu de Montreal and the old Seminary of San Sulpice. Interesting sights that appeared in Old Montreal, and later, during the British rule. At this time Montreal has suffered from constant fires, but was rebuilt and grew even harder. The oldest urban monument, Nelson’s column, came here in 1809 on the square, which received the name of the New Market (from 1845 she wears the name of the place Jacques Cartier). In 1873 on the site of the former garden of the Jesuit monastery, has grown an impressive and magnificent building of city Hall, one of the brightest in the city. The second most striking architectural landmark of Old Montreal and Montreal — is actually built in 1829 magnificent Basilica of Notre Dame.
Old Montreal
Since that time the city was under the rule of the British, the Church received not the typical Catholic in appearance, and quite characteristic of Gothic revival and became one of the most magnificent and dramatic of his designs. Also when the British started to be built up of the Golden square Mile, the area is the most affluent and large mansions built for themselves the richest merchants. Commercial prosperity affected the building of St. James street became the financial center of the city. Here appeared such notable buildings as the Bank of Montreal, the oldest in the country, old customs and old court, as well as the market Bonsecour. The Victorian style of the late 19th century was substantially different from what prevailed in the area at the time of French rule, and profitable suffused the architectural look of Old Montreal.

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